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Avoiding Tax Return Identity Theft

Now that tax-time is just around the corner, the IRS offers several warning signs that you may be a victim of tax-related identity theft and what to do about them:

  1. Your attempt to file your tax return electronically is rejected. You get a message saying a return with a duplicate Social Security number has been filed.  First, check to make sure you did not transpose any numbers.  Also, make sure one of your dependents, for example, your college-age child, did not file a tax return and claim themselves. If your information is accurate, and you still can’t successfully e-file because of a duplicate SSN, you may be a victim of identity theft. You should complete Form 14039, Identity Theft Affidavit. Attach it to the top of a paper tax return and mail to the IRS.
  2. You receive a letter from the IRS asking you to verify whether you sent a tax return bearing your name and SSN. The IRS holds suspicious tax returns and sends taxpayers letters to verify them. If you did not file the tax return, follow the instructions in the IRS letter immediately.
  3. You receive income information at tax time from an employer unknown to you. Employment-related identity theft involves the use of your SSN by someone, generally an undocumented worker, for employment purposes only.
  4. You receive a tax refund that you did not request. You may receive a paper refund check by mail that the thief intended to have sent elsewhere. If you receive a tax refund you did not request, return it to the IRS. Write “VOID” in the endorsement section, and include a note on why you are returning it. If it is a direct deposit refund that you did not request, contact your bank and ask them to return it to the IRS. Search IRS.gov for “Returning an Erroneous Refund” for more information.
  5. You receive a tax transcript by mail that you did not request. Identity thieves sometimes try to test the validity of the personal data they have chosen or they attempt to use your data to steal even more information. If you receive a tax transcript in the mail and you did not request it, be alert to the possibility of identity theft.
  6. You receive a re-loadable, prepaid debit card in the mail that you did not request. Identity thieves sometimes use your name and address to create an account for a re-loadable prepaid debit card that they use for various schemes, including tax-related identity theft.

More information about tax-related identity theft can be found at Identity Protection: Prevention, Detection and Victim Assistance as well as the Taxpayer Guide to Identity Theft – all on IRS.gov.



One Comment for this Post
  • Alan Silverstein
    April 2, 2017 at 11:00 am

    Yup. Unfortunately hitting us this year, but fortunately not on this list, is this problem: “Your tax software package rounds off all your monthly Form 1095-A entries before adding, rather than after adding, resulting in a few dollars difference from the annual totals that you can’t enter directly in this particular package (TurboTax in particular) or cannot use if all 12 months are not the same (TaxSlayer for example), and for TY2016 unlike the past, for at least some taxpayers, over a month later the IRS sends an LTR-12C requesting a copy of your 1095-A because the numbers don’t match.” (grin)



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